SSDP Welcomes Two New Outreach Coordinators!

SSDP Welcomes Two New Outreach Coordinators!

The SSDP staff is now at eight sensible staff members with the addition of regional Outreach Coordinators, Tyler Williams and Frances Fu. Click here for a snapshot of your new staffers or keep reading below.

 

 

Tyler Williams

Regional Outreach Coordinator: Heartland, Midwest, Mountain Regions
School: University of Connecticut
Favorite quote: “The way that Emma Goldman took her coffee: “as black as night, as sweet as love, as strong as revolutionary zeal.”

Tyler Williams

SSDP Outreach Coordinator Tyler Williams

Tyler is a bundle of honeyed charisma, a loyal friend and skilled orator devoted to the pursuit of drug policy knowledge. His accomplishments include: lobbying to enact Connecticut’s medical marijuana program and successfully pushing the University of Connecticut Undergraduate Student government to pass a statement in support of legalizing cannabis.  He  has served as the editor-in-chief of The UConn Free Press, and worked at the campus radio station, 91.7 FM WHUS all four years as both a music DJ and producer of UConn SSDP Radio. Tyler will also be working on the This Week in Drugs podcast with other notable SSDP Rockstars, Sam Tracy and Rachelle Yeung. While you won’t be hearing his smooth voice spittin’ knowledge, he will be supporting the production and tech work for the show. A true Renaissance man.

 

What does sensible drug policy mean to you?
If we lived in a world with sensible drug policy, people would understand drugs the way they understand food. Some foods, like sugary foods, taste or feel good, but are bad for you. Some foods taste bad, but can be good for you, like medicine. Some people know they are allergic to certain foods, and so should avoid them completely, but not everyone’s allergies are the same. Our policies should reflect a wide spectrum of responsible, appropriate, and safe uses which may vary across the population and they should help to empower people to make good individual choices, rather than punishing them for struggling to do so. Put more simply: drug policies, like food, should work for people, not against people.

 

Why did you want to work for SSDP?
SSDP has provided me with the most enriching and formative experiences of my life, along with some of the best and most permanent friends I’ve ever met. I wanted to work for SSDP so that I could facilitate those sorts of experiences for other people. Also I wanted to become best friends with Drew Stromberg.

 

Frances Fu

Regional Outreach Coordinator: Pacific Region
School: Northwestern University
Favorite quote: “Don’t let anyone tell you you’re too young to accomplish something.  A baby shark is still a f*cking shark.”

Frances Fu

SSDP Outreach Coordinator Frances Fu

Since becoming involved with Students for Sensible Drug Policy, harm reduction has been a guiding principle in both her professional and personal pursuits. She has been involved with Sexual Health and Assault Peer Educators, Alpha Chi Omega sorority, and has served as President of Northwestern University’s Panhellenic Association. She was named Sorority Woman of the Year (2015) and  received the Highest Order of Excellence Society Award (2015) for her commitment to improving student life.

 

What does sensible drug policy mean to you?
We currently live in a world where our drug policies are more harmful than the drugs themselves. A sensible drug policy is one that not only avoids inflicting harm, but also facilitates people in making healthier choices. To me, the saddest drug tragedies are the accidents – overdoses because nobody called for help, or because people aren’t informed about what they’re taking in the first place. Drug addiction is bad, but dying is worse.

A sensible drug policy is one where people are free to make choices for themselves without stigma and surveillance. As long as we are living in a world where people can be randomly stopped and have their bodies searched, we are living in a world that reinforces rape culture. We live in a world where young men are taught everyday that consent doesn’t matter when it comes to physical interactions, or that it’s something that can be obtained through deception and dishonesty.

 

Why did you want to work for SSDP?
I am a Student for Sensible Drug Policy at heart! SSDP has always represented to me, a network of individuals who are devoted to learning and educating others, of people who are idealistic and believe that the world can be changed. SSDP is fighting for a world where both reason and love will win out.