Tag: overdose prevention

13
Dec

We should empower an industry that helps people with addiction

Written by Eitan Scher, chapter leader of Rutgers University SSDP. The following is a response to a December 4th editorial by former Member of Congress Patrick Kennedy titled “Legalize Weed? We should not empower an industry that profits from addiction”. Over 1,900 New Jersey residents died from an opioid overdose in the past year. Heroin-related deaths have doubled, and fentanyl-related

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7
Aug

How to Participate in the 2017 International Overdose Awareness Day

International Overdose Awareness Day (IOAD) is a global event held on August 31st each year that aims to raise awareness of overdose and reduce the stigma of a drug-related death. It also acknowledges the grief felt by families and friends remembering those who have met with death or permanent injury as a result of drug overdose. IOAD spreads the message

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21
Apr

SSDP Hosts Successful Regional Conference in the Midwest!

Last weekend, SSDP students, alumni, and supporters gathered at Northwestern University in Illinois for SSDP’s 2014 Midwest Regional Conference! More than 60 students attended the conference for an exciting weekend of expert presentations, training, workshops, and networking events. The speaker panels and events that took place throughout the day were each designed to give students the tools needed to continue growing

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10
Dec

Victory! University of South Florida Passes System-Wide 911 Good Samaritan Policy

The University of South Florida (USF) recently passed a Medical Amnesty/911 Good Samaritan Policy, which protects people from prosecution for simple possession of drugs or drug paraphernalia when calling for medical help during a drug-related emergency. The policy, enacted roughly one year after the state of Florida’s statewide 911 Good Samaritan Law took effect, was announced by Dean of Students Michael Freeman on

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11
Sep

SSDP Helps Implement Two New Call 911 Good Samaritan Policies

One campaign that has been a centerpiece for Students for Sensible Drug Policy chapters across the country, Call 911 Good Samaritan Policies, has been adopted by two new universities. Call 911 Good Samaritan Policies highlight the issues between health and punishment when dealing with alcohol and drugs on campus. These policies promote life-saving measures by allowing students to make responsible

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15
Feb

After 6 years, University of Maryland finally approves Good Samaritan policy for all drugs

Yesterday, I returned to the University of Maryland, my alma mater, to attend a University Senate (the governing body comprised of 90% faculty and staff, and 10% students) meeting where members voted 81-2-1 in favor of an important life-saving overdose prevention policy.  The Diamondback reports: After proposing a measure nearly six years ago that would protect dangerously drunk students or

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28
Oct

Illinois House passes life-saving overdose prevention bill

Yesterday, October 27, 2011, the Illinois House passed SB 1701, the Emergency Medical Services Access Act to Save Lives, more commonly known as a Good Samaritan policy.  After unanimously passing in the Senate in April of this year with a 57-0 vote, this is a long awaited victory in the state.  With Connecticut, Maryland, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Washington, Utah,

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9
Jun

Action Alert: Overdoses in NY

Here in New York, we’ve been hard at work trying to pass an Good Samaritan (or Medical Amnesty) bill that would protect individuals from criminal prosecution when calling 911 in an alcohol or other drug related medical emergency. This life-saving overdose prevention bill passed through the State Assembly last week and now we only have a few days left of the legislative

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3
Mar

UMD SSDP helps pass Good Samaritan Policy

Four years ago, as a sophomore at the University of Maryland (and at the time President of the UMD SSDP chapter), I was elected to the University Senate, the most powerful policy making body on campus, comprised of 90% faculty, and 10% students. In an effort to place myself in a position to influence campus drug policy, I sought and received

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